Occum Bruce Miller

Occum Miller was born in Shawano, Wisconsin and raised in Red Springs and Mohicanuck. His parents were Earl Leo Miller and Dollie Butler Miller; they had ten children. Their names are; Occum, Emerson, Arvid, Robert, Carol, Salmer, Arnold deceased, Earl Jr., Fawn Monica, and Patricia Dollie. The only living siblings Occum has are Earl Jr., and Patricia Dollie.

As a youth he enjoyed fishing, hunting, riding bike, riding horseback, playing softball, doing farm chores, and driving the old Model-A Ford.


Occum went to Stockbridge Community and Bowler High Schools. When we asked him what he liked about school, he replied "I didn’t like anything about school!" He added that he was always inclined to resist authority and caused a great many problems for teachers and fellow students. He said, "For this, I am remorsefully ashamed."


He met his wife, Julie Juanita Miller at a house party in Chicago. They’ve been married over 45 years. They have two sons; Steve and Jesse, and two daughters; Suelaine and Brenda. They’ve been blessed with two granddaughters; Angi and Tristen, three grandsons; Justin, Jason, and Jamie, and one great grandson, Jay.


Occum worked for J.H. Glover Company doing flooring, the Arizona Highway Department as a construction worker, General Baptist Church as a Missionary, American Lutheran Church as a Missionary and as Church Pastor.


He served in the US Army, 24th Infantry Division from 1951-1954. He served in Korea and was honorably discharged. He traveled to Japan and Korea and all over the United States, but he says that Arizona is his favorite place.


Occum now lives in Arvada, Colorado. He likes to read, write, and study God’s word with his grandchildren. He’s most proud of his service in the US Military and the Missionary work he’s done. He has preached the gospel to at least 20 Indian tribes in the Southwestern United States and also Minnesota.


"To the youth, of our tribe, I would like to offer the following advice: "Plan for the long-term. As I read each publication of the Mohican News with much interest, and I must admit, with a certain amount of pride, I’m reminded of all the planning and discussion and labor that must be involved in what is taking place at MohHeConNuck today. The results of all these efforts by both adults and youth are very beneficial to all our people in the short term. Now you may say, "just a moment, we are planning also for those who will benefit after we are long gone." Yet in the final analysis, is it not only for the short-term? It is only for this earthly existence. When you reach my age, you may look back and say, "Wow! That was really short-term." Now we are all going somewhere from here. Yes, our final destiny. Now that’s really the long-term. It is "from now on." I’ve thought many times of my dad who has been out there somewhere in eternity for 45 years now. Where? And it has not even begun. Yet even more worthy of our attention, than the final disposition of our souls, is the audacity of remaining in rebellion against a loving God who "is not willing that any should perish but that all should come to a knowledge of the truth." Young people, plan for the long-term. Take the opportunity that is now yours to come to a knowledge of the truth. Do not leave your destiny in the hands of any other person, your father, mother, sister, brother, or even your pastor. All these may be of assistance to you, but your final destiny is a personal thing between you and your God. None of these will be there with you when you stand before the judgment seat of Christ. Open your bible, begin with the gospel of John and …begin to plan for the long term!" said Occum.